Mystic Dinner (Doña Guiomar of Ulloa, St. Teresa of Avila, St. Peter of Alcantara, Christ)

Mystic Dinner (Doña Guiomar of Ulloa, St. Teresa of Avila, St. Peter of Alcantara, Christ)

c. 1730
Artist
Gaspar Munoz de Salazar, Mexican
Active Years: circa 1700-1750
Locale
Puebla, Mexico
Country
Mexico
painting
Oil on canvas
Gift of the Collection of Frederick and Jan Mayer
2015.542
Gaspar Munoz de Salazar (Mexican). Mystic Dinner (Doña Guiomar of Ulloa, St. Teresa of Avila, St. Peter of Alcantara, Christ) . c. 1730. Oil on canvas. Gift of the Collection of Frederick and Jan Mayer. 2015.542.
Dimensions
image height: 28.75 in, 73.0250 cm; image width: 39.375 in, 100.0125 cm; frame height: 35.875 in, 91.1225 cm; frame width: 46.625 in, 118.4275 cm
Inscription
Signed in LLC, as per Valery Taylor Brown, "Munoz ft."
Department
Mayer Center, Latin American Art
Collection
Latin American Art
Gaspar Muñoz de Salazar was active in the first half of the 18th century in Puebla, Mexico. The painting is of a domestic scene that includes pets, a subject that is uncommon in Mexican colonial art. Four figures sit in 18th-century green covered chairs around a table. A silver saltcellar sits in the center of the table with food and silverware strewn about. The fruits on the table appear to represent a mixture of those introduced to the New World from Europe (grapes, pear, pomegranate) and ones native to the New World (chirimoya, guanabana, chiles). Dona Guiomar (far left), a wealthy widow living in Avila, Spain during the 16th century, welcomed into her house leading religious figures of the time. She was a patron of the Discalced Franciscans, with whom St. Peter of Alcántara (second from right) was affiliated, and of the Reformed Carmelite Order founded by St. Teresa of Avila (second from left). According to legend Dona Guiomar introduced Peter and Teresa in 1558. Followers of both Peter and Teresa wrote of occasions in which they witnessed Peter being given food and drink by Christ (far right). Peter, as an act of religious devotion, practiced extreme self-deprivation and poverty. Perhaps this painting is from a series depicting the life of St. Teresa of Avila or St. Peter of Alcántara and was created for a convent or monastery in Puebla. --Julie Wilson Frick, 2015
Known Provenance
Loaned 23 February 2000 by Frederick and Jan Mayer to the Denver Art Museum. Provenance research is on-going at the Denver Art Museum. Please e-mail provenance@denverartmuseum.org, if you have questions, or if you have additional information to share with us.
Exhibition History
  • Exhibited 1999 "Pintura y Vida Cotidiana en Mexico 1650-1950," Fomento Cultural Banamex, Mexico City, Mexico.

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