Sufi Alms Bowl (Kashkul)

Sufi Alms Bowl (Kashkul)

Late 1700s–early 1800s
Country
Iran
bowl
Steel with gold inlay
Gift of Bj Averitt
1994.6
. Sufi Alms Bowl (Kashkul). Late 1700s–early 1800s. Steel with gold inlay. Gift of Bj Averitt. 1994.6.
This object is currently on view
Dimensions
height: 5.25 in, 13.3350 cm; width: 14 in, 35.5600 cm
Department
Asian
Collection
Asian
Sufi Begging Bowl (Kashkul) by Hajji ibn 'Abbas Iran late 1700s-early 1800s, Zand or Qajar period Engraved steel with gold calligraphy Gift of Bj Averitt 1994.6 Mendicant Sufi holy men were a familiar sight throughout Islamic history. They chose lives of poverty, renouncing earthly goods and subsisting on offerings of food or money from the devout. Each would have carried a guide to worship and a kashkul, or begging bowl. This bowl is in the shape of a coco-de-mer, or double coconut, and bears the signature of the maker, Hajji ibn ‘Abbas.
Known Provenance
1993, Bj Averitt [d. 2014], Denver CO, acquired through Dr. Ernst J. Grube [d. 2011], London; 1994, DAM collection, gift of Mrs. Bj Averitt.

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