Denver Art Museum Exhibition Schedule

This exhibition calendar is current as of 5/3/2022. Please confirm dates and titles with the museum’s press office before publication at pressoffice@denverartmuseum.org, as information provided here is subject to change. Contact the press office for additional information, interview requests, images or exhibition sponsor information.

Featured Exhibitions

ReVisión: Art in the Americas
Oct. 24, 2021–July 17, 2022

Traitor, Survivor, Icon: The Legacy of La Malinche
Feb. 6, 2022–May 8, 2022

Modern Women/Modern Vision: Works from the Bank of America Collection
May 1, 2022–Aug. 28, 2022

Carla Fernández Casa de Moda: A Mexican Fashion Manifesto
May 1, 2022–Sept. 5, 2022

Age of Armor: Treasures from the Higgins Collection at the Worcester Art Museum
May 15, 2022–Sept. 5, 2022

Georgia O’Keeffe, Photographer
July 3, 2022–Nov. 6, 2022

Who Tells a Tale Adds a Tail: Latin America and Contemporary Art
July 31, 2022–March 5, 2023

Upcoming and On View in the Galleries

The 19th Century in European and American Art
Now on view

Memory Mirror
July 3, 2021–March 19, 2023

By Design: Stories and Ideas Behind Objects
Now on view

Curious Visions: Toward Abstract Photography
Oct. 24, 2021–June 19, 2022

Fantastic Brush: Twentieth-Century Chinese Ink Art from the Robert and Lisa Kessler Collection
Now on view

Gio Ponti: Designer of a Thousand Talents
Oct. 24, 2021–Jan. 1, 2023

Disruption: Works from the Vicki and Kent Logan Collection
Jan. 16, 2022–Jan. 22, 2023

Featured Exhibitions

Grid of 16 images

After Marco Chillitupa Chávez, Inca Rulers and Francisco Pizarro, Spanish Conqueror of Peru, late 19th century. Lima or Cuzco, Peru. Oil paint on canvas, ea. 25-1/2 x 19-1/2 in. Denver Art Museum Collection: Gift of Dr. Belinda Straight, 1977.45.1-.16. This image represents 16 individual artworks.

firgure of a life-size teenager carved in polychrome cedar wood on top of a skateboard

Jorge Pineda, Afro: Charlie, Dominican Republic, 2009. Installation, figure of a life-size teenager carved in polychrome cedar wood, skateboard and graphite on the wall; 63 x 17-3/10 x 9-1/2 in. Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros. ©Jorge Pineda. Photo ©Mariano Hernández.

ReVisión: Art in the Americas

Oct. 24, 2021–July 17, 2022

A strong selection of artworks from the Denver Art Museum’s (DAM) Latin American and Art of the Ancient Americas collections—hailed as among the best in the country—is on view in ReVisión: Art in the Americas. ReVisión tells a visually compelling narrative about the formation of the Americas from 100 B.C. to today through nearly 180 objects. The thematic presentation explores land, people and place by linking ancient and contemporary artworks that address political and social issues at the heart of the region’s cultural heritage as well as expand the narrative through voices that include women artists and contemporary voices that speak to the diversity of the Americas.

The majority of the works on view are from the DAM’s permanent collection, with additional loans from institutions including the Blanton Museum of Art, the Pérez Museum and the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros. The exhibition is on view in the Martin Building’s new and reimagined Bonfils-Stanton Gallery, designed by the award-winning firm IKD of Boston.

In connection with the exhibition, a fully illustrated 144-page catalog titled ReVisión: A New Look at Art in the Americas is available in The Shop at the Denver Art Museum and via its online store. ReVisión provides a bilingual English and Spanish experience, and is included in general admission, which is free for members and youth 18 and under.

ReVisión: Art in the Americas was organized by DAM curators Victoria Lyall, Frederick and Jan Mayer Curator of Art of the Ancient Americas, and Jorge Rivas Pérez, Frederick and Jan Mayer Curator of Latin American Art #ReVisionatDAM

ReVisión: Art of the Americas is organized by the Denver Art Museum. It is presented with generous support from the National Endowment for the Arts, Carl & Marilynn Thoma Art Foundation, Kathie and Keith Finger, donors to the Annual Fund Leadership Campaign, and the residents who support the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District (SCFD). Promotional support is provided by 5280 Magazine and CBS4.

Screen print of a scene featuring Malinche

María Cristina Tavera, La Malinche Conquistada, 2015. Screen print; 26 1/8 × 26 1/8 in. (66.4 × 66.4 cm). Courtesy of the artist. © Maria Cristina Tavera. Photo by Xavier Tavera.

Surrealist painting of a woman sleeping on her side with a Mexican village rising out of her bed.

Antonio Ruíz, El sueño de la Malinche (Malinche’s dream), 1939. Oil paint on Masonite (engineered wood); 11 7/8 × 15 3/4 in. (30 × 40 cm). Galería de Arte Mexicano, Mexico City. © Archivo Antonio Ruíz. Image © and courtesy Galería de Arte Mexicano, Mexico City.

Traitor, Survivor, Icon: The Legacy of La Malinche

Feb. 6, 2022–May 8, 2022

Traitor, Survivor, Icon: The Legacy of La Malinche examines the historical and cultural legacy of La Malinche. Both reviled as a traitor and hailed as the mother of Mexico, Malinche is an enigmatic figure whose legacy has been the subject of controversy, legend, and adulation from the 1500s through the present day.

An enslaved Indigenous girl who became Hernán Cortés’ interpreter and cultural translator, Malinche stood at center stage in one of the most significant events of modern history. She was a linguistically gifted protagonist who played a key role in the transactions, negotiations and conflicts between the Spanish and the Indigenous populations of Mexico that impacted the course of global politics for centuries to come. Significantly, as mother to Cortés’ first-born son she became the symbolic progenitor of a modern Mexican nation, built on both Indigenous and Spanish heritage.

While Malinche has been the subject of numerous historical publications and works of art, Traitor, Survivor, Icon is the first museum exhibition to present a comprehensive visual exploration of Malinche’s enduring impact on communities living on both sides of the US-Mexico border. Five hundred years after her death, her image and legacy remain relevant to conversations around female empowerment, Indigeneity, and national identity throughout the Americas. Traitor, Survivor, Icon will establish and examine her symbolic import and the ways in which artists, scholars, and activists through time have appropriated her image to interpret and express their own experiences and agendas from the 1500s through today.

The exhibition is included in general admission, which is free for members and youth 18 and under. #MalincheatDAM

Traitor, Survivor, Icon: The Legacy of La Malinche is organized by the Denver Art Museum. This exhibition has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Democracy demands wisdom. Additional funding is provided by Furthermore: a program of the J.M. Kaplan Fund, the donors to the Annual Fund Leadership Campaign, and the residents who support the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District (SCFD). Promotional support is provided by 5280 Magazine and CBS4.

Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this exhibition do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Surreal painting of a blue muted bedroom surrounded by bright orange goldfish

Sandy Skoglund (American, b. 1946), Revenge of the Goldfish, 1981. Cibachrome print. Bank of America Collection. © 1981 Sandy Skoglund

Black and white photoof an African American woman talking to her daughter at the kitchen table

Carrie Mae Weems (American, b. 1953), Untitled (Woman with daughter), from the Kitchen Table Series, 1990. Gelatin silver print. Bank of America Collection, © Carrie Mae Weems. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

Modern Women/Modern Vision: Works from the Bank of America Collection

May 1, 2022–Aug. 28, 2022

Modern Women/Modern Vision: Works from the Bank of America Collection is an exhibition of photography featuring more than 100 images by women artists celebrating bold and dynamic contributions by women to the development and evolution of photography.

This outstanding collection of some of the 20th century’s foremost photographers includes works by Berenice Abbott, Diane Arbus, Eva Besnyö, Margaret Bourke-White, Imogen Cunningham, Dorothea Lange, Barbara Morgan, Cindy Sherman, Sandy Skoglund and Carrie Mae Weems. Women embraced photography early on, in part because the newer medium had fewer barriers for female participation, compared with more traditional art forms such as painting and sculpture.

Modern Women/Modern Vision is organized in five thematic sections, including Modernist Innovators, Documentary Photography and the New Deal, New York’s Photo League, Modern Masters, Exploring the Environment and The Global Contemporary Lens to reflect the impact of female artists in the medium of photography.

On loan from the Bank of America collection through its Art in our Communities program, the exhibition is curated locally by Eric Paddock, Curator of Photography at the DAM. On view in the Hamilton Building’s level 2 Anschutz Gallery, the exhibition will be included in general admission, which is free for members and youth 18 and under. #PhotographyatDAM

This exhibition has been loaned through the Bank of America Art in our Communities® program. It is presented with generous support from the donors to the Annual Fund Leadership Campaign and the residents who support the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District (SCFD). Promotional support is provided by 5280 Magazine and CBS4.

Portrait photo of Carla Fernández

Carla wearing Coyolxahuqui Jumper, Nuestras Diosas (Our Goddesses) Collection, Spring–Summer 2020. Photo of Carla Fernández by and © of Ben Lamberty. Image courtesy Carla Fernández.

Carla Fernández Casa de Moda: A Mexican Fashion Manifesto

May 1, 2022–Sept. 5, 2022

Carla Fernández Casa de Moda: A Mexican Fashion Manifesto is the first exhibition to fully explore the career of Mexican artist and fashion designer Carla Fernández, founder of the eponymous fashion brand in May 2022. The acclaimed Mexico City-based fashion brand, established in 2000, is a couture house that aims to bring new meaning to the luxury world as an agent of social and ethical change and innovation.

Taller Flora mobile laboratory—Carla Fernández’s traveling studio—meets with communities throughout Mexico at the invitation of artisan cooperatives that create handmade textiles and crafts. Over time, Fernández has learned and witnessed how these master artisans draw upon oral history and transmission of techniques. She collaborates with the artisans in the creative and production processes, creating contemporary designs for the global market. Carla Fernández Casa de Moda explores how the design house links ancient and contemporary techniques.

Mexican artist, architect, sculptor and activist Pedro Reyes designed the gallery for the exhibition using sculpture, architecture, video and photography. On view on level six of the Martin Building, the exhibition will be included in general admission, which is free for members and youth 18 and under. #CarlaFernandezatDAM

Carla Fernández Casa de Moda: A Mexican Fashion Manifesto is organized by the Denver Art Museum. It is presented with generous support from Bridget and John Grier, donors to the Annual Fund Leadership Campaign, and the residents who support the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District (SCFD). Promotional support is provided by 5280 Magazine and CBS4.

Steel, iron, and brass head-to-toe field armor

Pompeo della Cesa, Field Armor from a Garniture, about 1595, steel, iron, brass, gold, silver, leather, fabric, 56.6 × 10.5 cm (22 5/16 × 4 1/8 in.), 47 lb., 15 oz (weight), The John Woodman Higgins Armory Collection, 2014.112. Image © 2021 Worcester Art Museum, all rights reserved.

Age of Armor: Treasures from the Higgins Collection at the Worcester Art Museum

May 15, 2022–Sept. 5, 2022

Age of Armor: Treasures from the Higgins Collection at the Worcester Art Museum examines the historical context of armor and the pragmatic functions it served, as well as the ideological sentiments about armor from the Middle Ages into the modern era, and across many cultures.

Age of Armor will feature more than 80 objects from the Higgins Collection, supplemented by pieces from the DAM’s own collections. Works from numerous departments were selected to explore ideas more deeply and connect the exhibition to the modern period. These works will encourage visitors to consider how the legacy of armor and the cultural meanings it reflects have endured through time, influencing modern artwork, and in some cases, challenging romanticized imagery of knighthood and chivalry.

Organized thematically into eight sections, the exhibition includes interpretative stations that will allow visitors to experience the craftsmanship of armor, feel chainmail and discover how armor was influenced by nature. A catalog published by the Worcester Art Museum accompanies the exhibition. Age of Armor is included in general museum admission, which is free for members and youth under 18. #ArmoratDAM

Age of Armor: Treasures from the Higgins Collection at the Worcester Art Museum is organized by the Worchester Art Museum. Support is provided by the donors to the Annual Fund Leadership Campaign and the residents who support the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District (SCFD). Promotional support is provided by 5280 Magazine and CBS4.

Black and white photograph of a Jimsonweed flower

Georgia O'Keeffe, Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium), 1964–68, black-and-white Polaroid, Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe. © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum.

Georgia O’Keeffe, Photographer

July 3, 2022–Nov. 6, 2022

One of the most significant painters of the 20th century, Georgia O’Keeffe also had a lifelong connection to photography. The first exhibition devoted to the artist’s photographic practice, Georgia O’Keeffe, Photographer draws upon a trove of newly identified photographs and reveals a new aspect of the modernist artist’s career through nearly 100 photographs.

O’Keeffe's artistry has inspired volumes of scholarly analysis, exhibitions and portraiture. This exhibition finally sheds light on her work as a photographer. O’Keeffe focused on her mastery of painting for decades, but also was very fond of expressing her unique perspective through other mediums, such as photography. Her creative identity and singular artistry were well established by the time she focused on her photography in the mid-1950s, showing the artist’s ongoing fascination with the cycles and transformations of nature.

The exhibition is organized by the key tenets of O’Keeffe’s photography: reframing, the rendering of light and seasonal change, revealing the ways she used photography as part of her unique and encompassing artistic vision. #OkeeffeatDAM

Georgia O'Keeffe, Photographer is organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, with the collaboration of the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe. Support for the Denver Art Museum exhibition is provided by the Kristin and Charles Lohmiller Exhibitions Fund, the donors to the Annual Fund Leadership Campaign, and the residents who support the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District (SCFD). Promotional support is provided by 5280 Magazine and CBS4.

Man in purple face in a surreal orange and blue landscape

Tessa Mars, Untitled, Praying for the visa, 2019. © Tessa Mars. Photo: Tessa Mars.

Black and white photo of a group of neighborhood kids posing for the camera

Juan Fuentes, Westwood Kids, 2020. © Juan Fuentes. Photo: Juan Fuentes.

Who Tells a Tale Adds a Tail: Latin America and Contemporary Art

July 31, 2022–March 5, 2023

Who Tells a Tale Adds a Tail: Latin America and Contemporary Art will feature dozens of art works commissioned from emerging artists expressing experiences and nuances of contemporary Latin American life. The exhibition highlights the work of 19 contemporary artists connected to Latin America, and the ways in which their work reflects and interacts with relevant themes ranging from technology, to ideas surrounding identity, to broader social and political issues.

Who Tells a Tale is the first major exhibition at the museum curated by Raphael Fonseca, the DAM’s new Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Latin American Art. The exhibition title is inspired by a proverb from Fonseca’s homeland, Brazil. “Quem conta um conto, aumenta um ponto,” which directly translates to “who adds a tale, adds a point,” points to the significance of continuing forward momentum through conversation. In this expansive exhibition, 19 artists from 13 countries will create new worlds and realities, inviting spectators to engage in narratives through a multitude of media: painting, sculpture, installation, textile, video, sound, digital and performance.

Who Tells a Tale will be presented in site-specific locations around the museum campus, as well as a complete takeover of the fourth floor Frederic C. Hamilton Building’s Modern and Contemporary art galleries. The exhibition will be included in general museum admission, which is free for members and youth under 18. #WhoTellsaTaleatDAM

Who Tells a Tale Adds a Tail: Latin America and Contemporary Art is organized by the Denver Art Museum. It is presented by the Birnbaum Social Discourse Project and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Additional support provided by donors to the Annual Fund Leadership Campaign and the residents who support the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District (SCFD). Promotional support is provided by 5280 Magazine and CBS4.

Upcoming and On View in the Galleries

Impressionistic painting of a wheat field against a dreamy blue sky.

Vincent van Gogh, Edge of Wheat Field with Poppies, 1887. Oil paint on canvas on pasteboard. Frederic C. Hamilton Collection, bequeathed to the Denver Art Museum. 35.2017.

Oil painting by Willard Leroy Metcalf titled "The Ten Cent Breakfast"

Willard Leroy Metcalf (American, 1858-1925), The Ten Cent Breakfast, 1887. Oil paint on canvas, 14.75 x 21.25 in. Gift of T. Edward & Tullah Hanley Collection to the Denver Art Museum, 1974.418

The 19th Century in European and American Art

Now on view

The 19th Century in European and American Art showcases about 85 artworks from the museum’s collection by Claude Monet, Berthe Morisot, Paul Cézanne, Édouard Manet, Willard Leroy Metcalf, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Childe Hassam and others that tell a story about one of the most important times in art history.

A pivotal time in Europe and America, the 1800s were marked by incredible change and upheaval. The industrial revolution happened alongside the exaltation of unspoiled nature; political revolutions alternated with the restoration of conservative regimes, and in art, the century began with a craze for antiquities and ended with a march toward abstraction, a shift so groundbreaking that there is hardly any comparison with centuries past.

A key feature of The 19th Century in European and American Art is a collection of more than 20 Impressionist paintings, including four works by Claude Monet and the first paintings by Vincent Van Gogh and Paul Cézanne to enter the museum’s collection, generously bequeathed by Frederic C. Hamilton in 2014. This was the largest gift of French Impressionist paintings the museum has ever received. The exhibition is included with general admission. #MasterpiecesatDAM

Funding is provided by the donors to the Annual Fund Leadership Campaign and the residents who support the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District (SCFD). Promotional support is provided by 5280 Magazine and CBS4.

View of Lares Feliciano's Memory Mirror installation at the Denver Art Museum, 2021

View of Lares Feliciano's Memory Mirror installation at the Denver Art Museum, 2021.

Memory Mirror

July 3, 2021–March 19, 2023

Lares Feliciano’s Memory Mirror is an immersive installation that invites visitors to explore their relationship with memory through animation, dioramas, and interactive storytelling. Designed to evoke the memory of a relative’s living room, Memory Mirror transforms the museum’s Precourt Family Discovery Hall into a surreal domestic den that is both familiar and fantastic.

As part of the installation, Lares Feliciano is inviting the community to contribute images or an audio recording that represents a personal memory. These shared memories will result in a changing animation and experience that evolves regularly, morphing and changing, just like memory. To contribute your memory, leave a voicemail at 720-913-0190 or submit a memory online. Please review our disclaimer before contributing. The installation is included in general admission. #MemoryMirroratDAM

Ruskin blue vase

Ruskin Pottery, Vase, 1920. Stoneware with kingfisher blue luster glaze; 12-1/4 x 6 in. Denver Art Museum, gift of the Collection of Carl Patterson, 2018.81.

Psychedelic concert poster with red silhouette of woman at the center

Victor Moscoso, American, born Spain, 1936. Miller Blues Band at Matrix, 1967. Offset lithograph. Partial gift of David and Cheryl Tippit; partial purchase with Architecture and Design acquisition funds; and partial purchase from the Volunteer Endowment Fund in honor of R. Craig Miller, 2008.787.

By Design: Stories and Ideas Behind Objects

Now on view

Whether it takes the form of objects and spaces, images and interactions, or systems and processes, design is all around us and shapes our lives in fundamental ways. But what shapes design?

By Design: Stories and Ideas Behind Objects presents a series of thematic installations drawn primarily from the architecture and design collection, illustrating the abundance and versatility of approaches to design. How does it come into being? Who creates it and for what purpose? How does it serve society? What trends inspire it?

The motivations behind these designs are as diverse as their creators. Unusual or newly available materials invite vigorous experimentation. The form of an object can solve problems, serve its users and improve efficiency. Methods of production can range from handcrafted to digital fabrication. Personal, subjective and time-bound ideas can be expressed through design. Whatever the approach, they spark a deeper understanding and appreciation of design.

The inaugural exhibition in the Martin Building's new Amanda J. Precourt Galleries, By Design showcases objects from the DAM’s architecture and design collection. This collection encompasses one of the most preeminent modern and contemporary design collections of any comprehensive museum in the U.S., featuring a broad range of design practices, including architecture, furniture and industrial and graphic design.

This exhibition is organized by Darrin Alfred, curator of architecture and design, with gallery design by OMA New York and Shohei Shigematsu, OMA partner. #DenverArtMuseum

Abstract close-up photograph of the blue sky.
Brenda Biondo, Moving Picture no. 25, 2016. Dye sublimation on aluminum; 28-3/4 x 29 in. (framed 29-5/8 x 29-7/8 in.) Funds from the Morgan Family Legacy Foundation, 2020.294.

Curious Visions: Toward Abstract Photography

Oct. 24, 2021–June 19, 2022

Curious Visions: Toward Abstract Photography explores photographic experimentations with abstraction from the past 100 years. Approximately 60 works are featured, spotlighting photographers including Uta Barth, Jaromír Funke, Eliot Porter, Aaron Siskind, Man Ray and Brett Weston. Curious Visions is the debut exhibition in the new Delisa & Anthony Mayer Galleries. Spanning more than 2,800 square feet on level 6 of the Martin Building, the galleries nearly double the exhibition space for photography and will feature regular rotations of work from the permanent collection and beyond. The new galleries also incorporate a range of interactive engagement opportunities that prompt visitors to rethink their own relationship to photography in daily life.

Curious Visions is organized by the DAM and curated by Eric Paddock, curator of photography. #DenverArtMuseum #PhotographyatDAM

Ink and color drawing of a lion hunting a snake

Xu Beihong, Lion and Snake, 1938. Ink and colors on paper, 36½ x 35. Lent by Robert and Lisa Kessler, 230.2021.

Fantastic Brush: Twentieth-Century Chinese Ink Art from the Robert and Lisa Kessler Collection

Now on view

The 23 ink paintings featured in Fantastic Brush: Twentieth-Century Chinese Ink Art from the Robert and Lisa Kessler Collection showcase some of the most important artists in 20th-century China, including Zhang Daqian, Qi Baishi, Xu Beihong, Wu Changshuo and Wu Guanzhong. The artists come from very different backgrounds: some traveled to Europe to study Western art, some went to Japan to study Japanese art and Western art as filtered through Japanese experience, and others never went abroad. Nevertheless, all were well versed in traditional Chinese ink art and all were confronted with rapidly changing times and found their own unique interpretation of what it means to produce ink art in the 20th century.

After 1949 and the establishment of communist government under Mao Zedong, some artists left mainland China, moving to Hong Kong, Taiwan, and other countries. For those who stayed on the mainland, their art and lives were significantly altered by the political climate, especially during the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s and 70s. Collectively, the works on view manifest some of the most important transformations in Chinese ink art in modern times. #DenverArtMuseum

Exterior view of the Denver Art Museum from 1971, photograph by Wayne Thom.

Exterior of the Denver Art Museum, 1971. Photo by Wayne Thom.

Maroon Amazonian vase

Gio Ponti (Italian, 1891–1979), The Triumph of the Amazons Vase, 1925. Porcelain. Manufactured by Richard-Ginori, Milan. Collection of Robert and Lisa Kessler.

Gio Ponti: Designer of a Thousand Talents

Oct. 24, 2021–Jan. 1, 2023

Gio Ponti (1891–1979) was one of the most inventive Italian architects and designers of his time. For more than 60 years, Ponti’s exuberant approach found expression in public and private commissions from buildings, interiors and furniture to glass, ceramics and flatware. Through Domus, the magazine he founded in 1928, he influenced international design for over 50 years. In 1965, at the age of 74, Ponti was hired to collaborate with Denver-based James Sudler Associates on the design of a new building for the DAM.

Ponti’s multidisciplinary creativity reflected his insatiable search for innovation and a mind at home with contradiction. Drawn to classical forms, he always looked toward the future. One of the 20th century’s most influential advocates of mass production, Ponti also valued artisanal craftsmanship. His architecture grew out of concern for essential functions, but he had a passion for surface decoration. Throughout his dynamic career Ponti employed a vast array of both traditional and modern materials and techniques.

Gio Ponti: Designer of a Thousand Talents is one of the inaugural exhibitions in the Martin Building's new design galleries, showcasing objects from the DAM’s architecture and design collection. This collection encompasses one of the most preeminent modern and contemporary design collections of any comprehensive museum in the U.S. This exhibition is organized by Darrin Alfred, DAM curator of architecture and design. The Joanne Posner-Mayer Mezzanine Gallery was designed by OMA New York and Shohei Shigematsu, OMA partner. #GioPonti

Gavin Turk's "Camouflage Self-portrait (A Man Like Mr. Kurz)"

Gavin Turk, Camouflage Self-portrait (A Man Like Mr. Kurz), 1994. Silver-dye bleach transparency in light box; 40-1/2 x 40-1/2 x 6 in. Gift from Vicki and Kent Logan to the Collection of the Denver Art Museum. ©Gavin Turk and courtesy Sean Kelly Gallery, New York.

Disruption: Works from the Vicki and Kent Logan Collection

Jan. 16, 2022–Jan. 22, 2023

Disruption: Works from the Vicki and Kent Logan Collection presents about 50 artworks including paintings, sculptures, photographs, mixed-media works, and several artworks never before displayed at the museum. This outstanding collection features many works by noted North American and international contemporary artists including Kent Monkman, Yang Shaobin, Zhang Dali, Elmgreen and Dragset, Agustina Woodgate, Glenn Ligon and Jenny Saville.

The exhibition was initially conceived through the lens of the spheres we navigate in our daily lives: the private, the public, the state, the inner space, the market and the imaginary. The works in Disruption question the past, the world today and the social spaces we navigate—upending political narratives, questioning our rights of freedom and access, subverting notions of identity, contesting social norms, critiquing consumer culture and imagining dystopian alternate realities. A gift of more than 300 works from the Vicki and Kent Logan more than 20 years ago has helped turn the Denver Art Museum into a powerhouse of contemporary art in the West. Disruption draws contemporary stories and narratives from the collection built from this dynamic partnership with the Logans, and also adds four loans from their private collection. Collectively these artworks interrupt expectations and unsettle conventions, inviting visitors to gain a deeper understanding of the ways in which artists challenge norms and push boundaries through disruptive actions. #DisruptionatDAM

Disruption: Works from the Vicki and Kent Logan Collection is organized by the Denver Art Museum. The exhibition is presented with the generous support of Vicki and Kent Logan. Additional funding is provided by the donors to the Annual Fund Leadership Campaign and the residents who support the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District (SCFD). Promotional support is provided by 5280 Magazine and CBS4.