Cabinet (contador)

Cabinet (contador)

17th century
Artist
Unknown
Country
Mexico
cabinet, contador
Wood, mother of pearl, tortoise shell, incised bone
Gift of the Collection of Frederick and Jan Mayer
2015.564A-N
Unknown. Cabinet (contador). 17th century. Wood, mother of pearl, tortoise shell, incised bone. Gift of the Collection of Frederick and Jan Mayer. 2015.564A-N.
This object is currently on view
Dimensions
height: 36.5 in, 92.7100 cm; width: 36.25 in, 92.0750 cm; depth: 19.75 in, 50.1650 cm
Department
Mayer Center, Latin American Art
Collection
Latin American Art
Chests were the most common furniture form in Spain and the colonies with portable writing chests that could be placed on stands or tables being particularly popular. Furniture forms veneered with fine wood marquetry had been produced in Spain for centuries with strong influence from Islamic furniture traditions. The use of mother of pearl and tortoise shell became popular in marquetry after the opening of new trade routes brought Asian decorative arts to Europe and the Americas and as a result of the accessibility of these raw materials in the Americas after the Spanish conquest. --Donna Pierce, 2015
Known Provenance
Provenance research is on-going at the Denver Art Museum. Please e-mail provenance@denverartmuseum.org, if you have questions, or if you have additional information to share with us.