Wheel

Wheel

1997-2005
Artist
HOCK E AYE VI Edgar Heap of Birds, Cheyenne, Arapaho, American, 1954-
Born: Wichita, KS
Work Locations: United States
Culture
Cheyenne or Arapaho
sculpture
steel, porcelain, and stone
Funds from Charles J. Norton by exchange, and funds from the Bonfils-Stanton Foundation, the AT&T Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Douglas Society.
1997.1452.1-10

HOCK E AYE VI Edgar Heap of Birds (Cheyenne/ Arapaho, born 1954), Wheel, 1997-2005. Steel, porcelain, and stone; 144 x 24 x 24 in. (each fork); arranged in 45 ft. diameter circle. Denver Art Museum: Funds from Charles J. Norton by exchange, and funds from the Bonfils-Stanton Foundation, the AT&T Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Douglas Society. Installed in 2005 with funding provided by an Economic Development Initiative Grant made possible by U.S. Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell. Relocated in 2021, 1997.1452.1-10. © HOCK E AYE VI Edgar Heap of Birds

Dimensions
height: 144 in, 365.7600 cm; depth: 24 in, 60.9600 cm; width: 24 in, 60.9600 cm; diameter,large: 45 ft, 13.716 m
Department
Native Arts
Collection
Indigenous Arts of North America
Inspired by Native American architectural forms and the Big Horn medicine wheel in Wyoming, Wheel is composed of ten tree forms arranged in a circular shape that is fifty feet in diameter. The trees are aligned to the summer solstice—on June 21, the sun rises in an opening to the east between the first and last trees. Artist HOCK E AYE VI Edgar Heap of Birds covered the forked red tree forms with text and imagery related to the history of Indian people in the United States and indigenous peoples elsewhere. Each tree addresses a specific theme, from conflict over resources to global cooperation among indigenous peoples. In addition to the tree forms, the sculpture incorporates a curved exterior wall of the museum, where the Cheyenne words nah-kev-ho-eyea-zim appear in raised letters. The phrase means “We are always returning back home again.”