Milk Drop Coronet

Milk Drop Coronet

1957
Artist
Harold Eugene Edgerton, American, 1903-1990
Born: Fremont, NE
Work Locations: Cambridge, MA
photograph
Dye transfer print
Gift of Harold and Esther Edgerton Family Foundation
1996.57.2
Harold Eugene Edgerton (American). Milk Drop Coronet. 1957. Dye transfer print. Gift of Harold and Esther Edgerton Family Foundation. 1996.57.2.
Dimensions
image height: 18.313 in, 46.5150 cm; image width: 13.313 in, 33.8150 cm; sheet height: 20 in, 50.8000 cm; sheet width: 16 in, 40.6400 cm; mat height: 28 in, 71.1200 cm; mat width: 22 in, 55.8800 cm
Edition
143/150
Inscription
Signed on verso in pencil; "8501.2143/5701" in pencil, LRC of verso.
Department
Photography
Collection
Photography

The strobe light was an obscure piece of laboratory equipment before MIT professor Harold Edgerton got his hands on it and turned it into a common tool—every flash camera has one nowadays, thanks to him. Edgerton’s improved strobe could create a burst of light so short and so bright that he could create a photo of something that could not be seen with the naked eye. Yet his work was about much more than just stopping time; Edgerton had a real sense of beauty and drama. This surprising and beautiful photograph of a milk drop hitting a saucer and splashing up into a coronet shape is a good example of the beautiful things Edgerton “saw” with his camera.

Exhibition History
  • "Exposure: Photos from the Vault"—Denver Art Museum, 4/30/2010 - 10/31/2010