Pedestal Bowl

Pedestal Bowl

A.D. 100-700
Culture
Recuay
Locale
Ancash
Country
Peru
bowl
Earthenware with colored slips and resist decoration
Gift of Frederick and Jan Mayer
1970.246
. Pedestal Bowl . A.D. 100-700. Earthenware with colored slips and resist decoration. Gift of Frederick and Jan Mayer. 1970.246.
Dimensions
height: 4 in, 10.1600 cm; diameter: 6.375 in, 16.1925 cm
Department
Mayer Center, Art of the Ancient Americas
Collection
Art of the Ancient Americas

Pedestal Bowl
Recuay
About A.D. 100–700
Peru, Ancash
Earthenware with colored slips and resist decoration
Gift of Frederick and Jan Mayer, 1970.246

The Recuay culture of north central Peru was centered in the highlands, including the Callejón de Huaylas.  This bowl closely resembles pottery excavated at Pashash, in the department of Ancash, and was likely made in the vicinity of this site.  An elite tomb there, possibly that of a woman, contained nearly 300 offerings.   Included were dozens of fine ceramics, stone vessels, gold and copper jewelry, and spindle whorls.  Pedestal cups and bowls were a common ceramic form, often decorated on both interior and exterior walls.  

This bowl was formed of a pale orange clay that was covered with cream-colored slip, then decorated with orange slip paints.  After firing, the orange areas were covered with a resist material (to protect them), and additional designs were painted on the cream-colored areas, also using the resist.  Next, the vessel was smoked or scorched over a fire, blackening the areas unprotected by the resist.  The final step was to wash or rub off the resist, revealing the orange and cream designs.

Known Provenance
Provenance research is on-going at the Denver Art Museum. Please e-mail provenance@denverartmuseum.org, if you have questions, or if you have additional information to share with us.