Tipi

Tipi

about 1880
Artist
Attributed to
Standing Bear, 1859-1934
Culture
Ochethi Sakowin (Sioux) | Lakota | Minneconjou | Brule Band
tipi
Paint and canvas on wood frame
Native Arts acquisition funds
1963.271

Attributed to Standing Bear, Minneconjou Lakhóta, 1859-1934, South Dakota, Tipi, about 1880. Paint, canvas, and wood frame; 184 x 252 x 156 in. Denver Art Museum: Native Arts acquisition funds, 1963.271

Dimensions
base diameter: ; overall height: 184 in, 467.36 cm; overall width: 252 in, 640.08 cm; overall depth: 156 in, 396.24 cm; diagonal: 198 in, 502.92 cm
Department
Native Arts
Collection
Indigenous Arts of North America
Tipis were originally made of buffalo hides, but by 1875, with the decline of buffalo herds and the introduction of canvas, tipi makers shifted to using this lighter weight material. The drawings on the tipi show the artist’s personal experiences of intertribal battles between the Sioux and their Crow and Pawnee enemies. The warriors are rendered in scrupulously accurate detail that makes it possible to recognize different tribes by their distinctive hairstyles and clothing.
Known Provenance
Created, designed, or owned by Standing Bear. Major L. F. Spencer [d. 1904], collected while working as an Agent at the Rosebud Agency, between 1885 and 1897. A.O. Backen, possible grandson or son-in-law of Major L. F. Spencer, Chicago, IL. Kohlberg’s (Kohlberg’s Antiques), Denver, CO, before 1963; Denver Art Museum, 1963.