Behind the Scenes at the DAM

Sneak Peek at 2013 at the DAM

Even after a really big year—exclusive U.S. venue for Yves Saint Laurent: The Retrospective and the only venue in the world for Becoming Van Gogh—we’re not resting on our laurels in 2013. We have an exciting mix of exhibitions that crisscross the globe. Read below for a sneak peak at the current 2013 lineup.

Georgia O'Keeffe in New Mexico: Architecture, Katsinam and the Land

February 10–April 28, 2013

Georgia O’Keeffe, Ram's Head, Blue Morning Glory, 1938. Oil on canvas; 20 x 30 in. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum; Gift of The Burnett Foundation. © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum.

This exhibition brings to light a relatively unknown aspect of Georgia O’Keeffe’s art and thinking—her deep respect for the diverse and distinctive cultures of northern New Mexico. O'Keeffe began spending part of the year living and working in New Mexico in 1929, a pattern she rarely altered until 1949 when she made northern New Mexico her permanent home. The exhibition features 53 O’Keeffe works including 15 rarely seen pictures of different Hopi katsina tihu, carved and painted representations of Hopi spirit beings, along with examples of these types of figures. Chronicling her artwork created in New Mexico, the exhibition explores O’Keeffe’s paintings of New Mexico’s Hispanic and Native American architecture, cultural objects, and her New Mexico landscapes.

Spun: Adventures in Textiles

May 19–September 22, 2013

Reconstruction #20, 1977, by Lucas Samaras (American, born in Greece, 1936). Sewn fabrics; H. 87 in, W. 85 in. Denver Art Museum; funds from National Endowment for the Arts, Dayton Hudson Foundation, Alliance for Contemporary Art, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Strauss, Mr. and Mrs. Donald S. Graham, and anonymous donor.

In summer 2013, the Denver Art Museum takes a wide-ranging look at textiles, from pre-Columbian weavings to modern fiber art, Navajo blankets to an examination of clothing in art and photography. Drawing on curatorial collections throughout the museum as well as loans and interactive on-site creations, Spun will be campus-wide in scope with a full slate of programming to complement the various textile art-related exhibitions. Look for exhibitions ranging from a focus on textile designer Jacqueline Groag to a photography exhibition connecting artists Seydou Keïta and August Sander. A drop-in textile studio, collaborative projects with artists and creative groups, and new in-gallery activities supported by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services will encourage visitors to join in the exploration of this ancient and still-vibrant medium.

Nick Cave: Sojourn

June 9–September 22, 2013

Nick Cave, Soundsuit, 2006. Mixed media. James Prinz Photography, Chicago. Courtesy of Nick Cave and the Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

Renowned contemporary artist Nick Cave will debut a new body of work at the museum in summer 2013. The artist will create a multi-sensory, immersive installation that will transport visitors to a magical world of color, texture, sound, and movement. Cave’s exhibition will feature a combination of multimedia elements and performances along with a selection of figurative sculptures the artist has dubbed Soundsuits for which he has become very well-known.

Mark Rothko in the 1940s

June 23–September 29, 2013

Mark Rothko, Untitled, 1948. Oil on canvas; 42-1/2 x 44 in. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Gift of The Mark Rothko Foundation, Inc., 1986.43.120. © 1998 Kate Rothko Prizel & Christopher Rothko / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Image Courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

Mark Rothko in the 1940s traces the development of Rothko’s work during the most critical decade of his career. In the early '40s, Rothko rejected realism and began a series of abstract works meant to evoke classical myth; in the late ’40s he created his first color field paintings, the works on which his stature as one of the most famous American painters of the post-war period rests. The exhibition also includes paintings by other celebrated abstract expressionists such as Robert Motherwell and Jackson Pollock, who shared Rothko’s search towards profound total abstraction. Drawn primarily from the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.—the largest repository of Rothko’s work anywhere in the world—the exhibition includes many paintings, drawings, and watercolors rarely seen before.

Image credit: Nick Cave, Speak Louder, 2011. Mixed media. James Prinz Photography, Chicago. Courtesy of Nick Cave and the Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

Ashley Pritchard is communications and media relations manager at the Denver Art Museum. Ashley has been at the DAM since 2008 and her favorite exhibition that has been on view here is Yves Saint Laurent: The Retrospective. She gets to peruse the galleries some mornings around 4 am for TV segments and loves having a little quiet time with the art.